Pointing To “A Beautiful Artistic Journey”

Drea is a mom who blogs about homeschooling, food and other things important to life (like books and riddles). When she finds cool products she points her followers toward them and I’m delighted that she pointed toward Seeking Cézanne. Thanks, Drea!

Thank you, Leslie

Leslie Clingan is a mom and former librarian who reviews books on her blog onceuponatimehappilyeverafter. I’m fortunate she chose to review Seeking Cézanne.

#seekingcezanne #bookstagram #mybookfeatures  #childrensbookwriter #childrensbookblogger  #booksforkids  #booklover #kidsbookshelf

Thanks, Joanna

Joannasbookshelf is a great source for book recommendations. Everything from 400-calorie cookbooks through psychological suspense to my new children’s book.

If you love books, joannasbookshelf is well worth a follow. I do.

#seekingcezanne #bookstagram  #mybookfeatures  #childrensbookwriter #childrensbookblogger  #booksforkids  #booklover #kidsbookshelf 

Enter The Book Giveaway

Owls Cove Press is giving away six signed first editions of Seeking Cézanne: A Children’s Mystery Inspired by Paul Cézanne and Other Artists.

The giveaway is hosted at Goodreads.com and ends on December 4, 2021.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Goodreads giveaways are very straightforward. One signs in to Goodreads and enters the contest. At the close, Goodreads randomly chooses six of the people who entered and copies are mailed to the six winners. The only requirement is that people who enter agree to list the book as “want to read” on their Goodreads page. They do not have to buy the book or pay anything.

Seeking Cézanne: A Children’s Mystery Inspired by Paul Cézanne and Other Artists is an adventure story about a brother and sister lost in a world of paintings and trying to get home. Grades 2 to 4, but anyone who appreciates beautiful art will love it.

An Interview With Ted

…plus information about writing that goes back to ancient Greece: Ekphrasis.

Possibly the oldest form of writing about art is known as ekphrasis. I am excited and pleased that The Ekphrastic Review published an interview with me about my book, Vincent, Theo and the Fox, which is inspired by the paintings of Vincent van Gogh.

You can read the interview here.

Carol Scheina, the interviewer, is a marvelous writer. You can find links to her imaginative and delightful stories here.

If you want to find excellent ekphrastic poems and stories (as well as podcasts and writing challenges), consider subscribing to The Ekphrastic Review.

For people interested in the craft of writing, you can’t go wrong reading The Ekphrastic Writer: Creating Art-Influenced Poetry, Fiction and Nonfiction by Janée J. Baugher.

Professor Marjorie Munsterberg created a website, Writing About Art, for her course of the same name at The City College of New York. You can read what she writes about ekphrasis here.

I’m sure your favorite search engine will reveal more. But first, if you haven’t already done so, please read the interview (it is about me, after all).

Thanks.

Ted

Three Views of Van Gogh for Children

Three new picture books give complementary views of the artist’s life.

Authors use the same facts differently. That is as true for picture books as it is for books geared to older ages. When you show children a set of books with different perspectives on the same subject, it helps them develop the capacity to think analytically. Doing this with picture books is a great way for younger kids to have fun while learning how to understand and master their world.

Here are three picture books that, together, help children think about the life of painter Vincent van Gogh.

61L0G3ptNjL._SX392_BO1,204,203,200_

Vincent Can’t Sleep by Barb Rosenstock and illustrated by Mary GrandPré is a biography of the painter told from the hook of children fighting sleep. It looks at van Gogh as a struggling artist driven to express himself and paint the night sky. Ages 4 to 8.

51v9oi4xsdl-_sx426_bo1204203200_

The Artist and Me by Shane Peacock and illustrated by Sophie Casson uses van Gogh’s time in Arles, France to teach about bullying. It looks at van Gogh as a visionary, bullied for being both poor and different. The story is told by one of the bullies as an adult looking back at what he did and what he learned. Ages 5 to 9.

case8.000x10.000.indd

Vincent, Theo and the Fox by Ted Macaluso (yes, that’s me) uses van Gogh’s life to teach about growing up and brotherhood. It looks at van Gogh, and his brother Theo, as two young boys who wonder what they should be when they grow up. Chasing a mischievous fox through van Gogh’s paintings they discover the answer to how to be the best you can be when you grow up. Ages 4 to 10.

One artist and three viewpoints. All three perspectives are true, which is the beauty of reading these three books together.

All three books have great reviews.

61L0G3ptNjL._SX392_BO1,204,203,200_

Kirkus Reviews called Vincent Can’t Sleep “a soft, sad, lovely introduction to a masterpiece.” Booklist said it is “a beautiful exploration of van Gogh’s influences and achievement.”

51v9oi4xsdl-_sx426_bo1204203200_

The School Library Journal’s assessment of The Artist and Me is that the book presents “…a troubling issue observed through the lens of art history [and] delivers a meaningful message about individuality and tolerance.”

case8.000x10.000.indd

Kirkus Reviews called Vincent, Theo and the Fox “a charming, unique way to introduce youngsters to great art while providing an important message.” ThePictureBookReview.com said: “[Vincent, Theo and the Fox] is the first book I’ve read where the illustrations are storied instead of the story being illustrated….It adds a depth of imagination that I’m not used to in picture books. I can’t think of any other picture book doing this–it’s wonderful!” 

Reading all three books can be a powerful experience. Together, they reinforce the reality that Vincent van Gogh was, like each and every one of us is, a complex, many-sided person.

Ted Macaluso lives in Reston, Virginia and blogs about children’s books and art at www.tedmacaluso.com.

Text © 2019 by Ted Macaluso.

Note: Some of the links above are “affiliate links” to Amazon.com, which means that Amazon pays me a few pennies if you end up buying the book through the link here. Your price is the same whether you use the affiliate link or find the book another way. The pennies don’t influence my judgment. These are all books I’ve read and recommend. You’re free to click, look on Amazon, and not buy.

%d bloggers like this: